Lesson 11: Descriptions and Possessives with pi

pi
pi
kalama
kalama
kulupu
kulupu
nasin
nasin

descriptive groupings with pi

Despite the relatively simple rules around its usage, when and how to use pi effectively is one of the most complicated aspects of speaking toki pona. Similarly when drawing sitelen sitelen, the use and placement of pi will take some practice. It is complicated enough that whenever I am laying out a glyph block with pi in it, I often start within pi and then work my way out.

orientation

pi
pi
pi
pi

Anatomically, the pi glyph is derived from the syllable pi, sticking it’s head up, emptied of contents, and ready to take on it’s role as a container. Once employed, it’s head stretches out like a goose’s neck, and rests next to the first group of glyphs. There are three common orientations for this goose neck: up and to the left, up and to the right, or left and down along the bottom.

common groupings

Like li and e, pi operates as a container to group other glyphs. Use of pi in toki pona almost always results in at least two glyphs within, and most commonly either one or two glyphs above. Unique to pi is the notion that the group of glyphs that operate as one unit includes a number of glyphs right before the pi as well. This entire grouping can then be found anywhere within a sentence that you could place a single glyph acting as a noun.

kulupu pi toki pona
kulupu pi toki pona
jan mute pi ma tomo
jan mute pi ma tomo
jan suli pi nasin musi
jan suli pi nasin musi

Once this grouping feels satisfactory, it’s time to fit it into the larger glyph block:

mi tawa tomo pi telo nasa.
mi tawa tomo pi telo nasa.
jan lawa pi tomo tawa kon li tawa sewi.
jan lawa pi tomo tawa kon li tawa sewi.
mi kama sona e nasin pona pi seli moku.
mi kama sona e nasin pona pi seli moku.

Depending on the fit, you may find you need to start again with one of the other orientations and build it back up from inside the pi on out.

possessives with pi

Structurally, possessives with pi operate in the same way:

nimi pi mama mije li seme?
nimi pi mama mije li seme?

The only time you may find a single glyph innside of pi is with the li pi formation:

kalama musi ni li pi mi.
kalama musi ni li pi mi.
ilo ni li pi sina.
ilo ni li pi sina.

opposites with pi and ala

Using ala within pi to express the opposite of also works as you would expect:

jan lawa pi kulupu jan utala li jan pi lape ala.
jan lawa pi kulupu jan utala li jan pi lape ala.
jan pi tomo ala li tawa mute.
jan pi tomo ala li tawa mute.

more than one pi

One of the initial temptations when learning toki pona is to try and distinguish the object you are describing from all other similar things. Raccoon becomes “night dirt eating animal of front hand feet” and you still haven’t ruled out the Opossum or Coati. Once you have more than one pi it’s often a sign that you are overloading your subject, and having to nest multiple pi containers will probably be more than enough help you put and end to that.

But every once in a while it can’t be helped, especially when working both with a possessive and descriptive grouping:

len pi jan pi lon anpa ma li jaki.
len pi jan pi lon anpa ma li jaki.

The best thing to do is to first establish how much space you need in order to draw the innermost glyphs. If you start working from the subject down to the period, you are almost assured of hitting a point where it is simply to tight inside the second nested pi.

The other thing to do is to try several orientations for both goose necks, and try and vary the orientations for better visual flow.

pi’ing in the wild

I encourage you to search out uses of pi in sitelen sitelen by myself and others to get a good sense of how it works when found within larger sitelen blocks. One good place to look is lipu lawa pi esun kama which contains 15 pi glyphs in total, including a nested pair and one used in linear isolation. Take a look at this altered image which highlights all of them, and then take another look at the original and see if you can spot them in the crowd.

lipu lawa pi esun kama